Arrow Energy prepares for massive campaign

THE ARROW Energy joint venture plans to drill 286 new production wells and commission a 440km gas pipeline across one of its permits in the Queensland CSG rich Surat Basin.
Arrow Energy prepares for massive campaign  Arrow Energy prepares for massive campaign  Arrow Energy prepares for massive campaign  Arrow Energy prepares for massive campaign  Arrow Energy prepares for massive campaign

Paul Hunt

Senior Journalist: Energy & Commodities

Paul Hunt

 

Arrow is a 50-50 owned subsidiary of Shell Australia and PetroChina. It submitted its plans for a fairly minor campaign last year. The original plan would have involved drilling six wells.

However, it subsequently filed an amendment to the environmental plan, adding a further 280 wells to the plan. 

On Monday, the Queensland Department of Environment and Science opened a public consultation for the newly proposed, far more extensive, campaign. 

The documents made available show 286 wells and 440km of gas-gathering and water pipelines across its Hopeland Petroleum Lease (PL253) at the Surat Gas Project. 

Each well will be drilled to depths between 200 metres and 800m. 

It comes about nine months after Arrow made a final investment decision to develop the SGP which will supply gas from its fields to the QCLNG joint venture - of which Shell is the operator. 

The initial 286 wells are part of a broader campaign to drill 2600 new gas production wells over 16 production licences designed to extend supply of gas to Arrow's Daandine and Tipton processing facilities and Shell's QCLNG project to the west. 

Arrow is still in the front end engineering design (FEED) stage, which will set out exactly how many wells will be drilled per year. 

The public consultation period will close on February 15. 

Activists have already published objections to Arrow's proposed project, noting some of the wells will be drilled near to the old Linc Energy underground coal gasification disaster. 

Local pastoralists said they wanted Arrow to wait until the former Linc Energy site was considered "fully resolved" and raised concerns there were "too many unknowns" given the level of contamination at the site.