What can Australia's LNG industry learn from Europe?

AUSTRALIA might have won the crown as the world’s largest exporter of LNG, but local industry has much to learn, according to Deloitte oil, gas and chemicals leader Bernadette Cullinane.
What can Australia's LNG industry learn from Europe? What can Australia's LNG industry learn from Europe? What can Australia's LNG industry learn from Europe? What can Australia's LNG industry learn from Europe? What can Australia's LNG industry learn from Europe?

Paul Hunt

Senior Journalist: Oil & Gas, Policy.

Paul Hunt

At the upcoming Australasian Oil and Gas Expo next week Cullinane will tell conference-goers that local industry, particularly Western Australia, can still learn from mature operators from other parts of the world.

Cullinane will chair a special AOG conference session focused on how other international LNG operators have weathered commodity cycles and created an integrated, diversified offshore industry.

"There is an opportunity for us to build on what we have in Australia to become a leading light of innovation and technology," Cullinane said ahead of the conference.

"The facilities we have hear are unlike any other. They are brand new, world-scale, highly sophisticated and technically cutting edge. We need to harness this platform and bring the power of rapid innovation into our thinking."

Cullanine will tell the conference to look to the North Sea where industry is most mature.

"The challenge now is to ensure our production can compete in an increasingly challenging global LNG market, while also stretching to embrace new opportunities," she said.

The Creating A Sustainable Ecosystem - Lessons from Europe session will be held on March 12. The session will feature speakers from Baker Hughes, GCE Ocean Technology, the Western Australian state government, and Scottish Development International.

During the session, GCE Ocean Technology chief Owe Hagesaether is expected to discuss the Norwegian experience, exploring how a cluster of almost 130 of the country's companies have come together to collaborate and support the oil and gas industry and adjacent industries in Norway - particularly seafood farming and renewable offshore wind energy.

Attendees will also hear from Baker Hughes vice president Graham Gillies who will discuss the company's global centre of excellence in Montrose, Scotland, which is a collaborative effort with the UK Government to build and grow innovative, cost-effective technologies to support the subsea industry in the North Sea.