New rules for oil and gas operators amid COVID-19 outbreaks 

CHAMBER of Minerals and Energy Western Australia chief executive Paul Everingham has said the new WA government rules that have effectively shut down the state’s border, will see fly-in-fly-out worker flights “massively curtained” with the majority of non-essential staff now sent home. 
New rules for oil and gas operators amid COVID-19 outbreaks  New rules for oil and gas operators amid COVID-19 outbreaks  New rules for oil and gas operators amid COVID-19 outbreaks  New rules for oil and gas operators amid COVID-19 outbreaks  New rules for oil and gas operators amid COVID-19 outbreaks 

"Now is not the time to think about profitability”: Everingham on FIFO curtailment

Paul Hunt

Senior Journalist: Oil & Gas, Policy.

Paul Hunt
Critical oil and gas facilities will continue to operate Everingham said over the weekend, but worker health and safety in the resources sector is the top priority. 
 
All entry to Western Australia will be restricted, by road, rail, air, and sea from 1.30pm AWST on Tuesday. 
 
"We're taking extraordinary measures to ensure our workforce and the communities in which we operate are not impacted," Mr Everingham said at a press conference alongside WA state premier Mark McGowan yesterday.  
 
"Now is not the time to think about profitability," he added. 
 
More than 240,000 people are directly employed across Australia's mining and energy resources industry. Around 100,000 of these work in Western Australia. 
 
Under the new rules initiated by the government, some FIFO personnel will still be allowed to enter and depart on dedicated charter aircraft that leave from Perth airport and arrive at specific oil and gas facilities. 
 
However, all workers will be required to undergo testing at facilities and checks will need to occur before interstate staff can enter sites. 
 
Each oil and gas facility will now be required to have trained medical professionals, including doctors, onsite to manage potential outbreaks of COVID19. 
 
Operators will also need to create specific quarantine zones and specialised isolation facilities. 
 
Already, Woodside Petroleum has culled its contracted staff by hundreds in order maintain worker health and safety and minimise any chance of a COVID-19 outbreak offshore, it said.  
 
"The health and safety of our people, the integrity of our operations and our ability to deliver gas to customers are our highest priorities," a Woodside spokesperson told Energy News. 
 
Woodside is expediating payments of all outstanding invoices to small and local businesses which generate less than A$10 million annual revenue. 
 
Last week Chevron Corporation was forced to isolate many of its workers after a suspected case of coronavirus at its Gorgon gas project in WA.
 
The West Australian newspaper claimed more than 20 staff were isolated after a worker developed symptoms after travelling overseas and failed to notify line management. 
 
"The medical team immediately followed public health guidelines," a spokesperson told Energy News. 
 
"We are taking measures to reduce risk including reviewing and testing work from home arrangements, reducing the overall number of people commuting to work, adopting social distancing guidelines including reducing the number of people per floor and leveraging digital technology to conduct meetings."